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Only 5% of all residents in the U.S., compared to 48% of all jobs, are within a half-mile of FRT stations. Building upon seven years of research, NITC investigators used economic analysis to determine development outcomes and land use planning implications of fixed route transit systems. Researchers updated a nationwide data repository that explores links between transit station proximity and real estate rents, jobs, people, and housing.
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Research and Events
November 2019
Economic and Development Benefits of Fixed Route Transit through Denser Housing: A National Assessment
Building upon seven years of research, NITC investigators used economic analysis to determine development outcomes and land use planning implications of fixed route transit systems. Researchers updated a nationwide data repository that explores links between transit station proximity and real estate rents, jobs, people, and housing. The newly expanded data offer a more representative look at development outcomes after the Great Recession. The main takeaway from this expanded analysis? Only 5% of all residents in the U.S., compared to 48% of all jobs, are within a half-mile of FRT stations.
The effects of smart-parking on transit and traffic: Evidence from SFpark
A new article by NITC researcher Nicole Ngo of the University of Oregon is published in the October 2019 issue of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. In a followup to her 2017 NITC study, "The Economic and Environmental Impacts of Smart-Parking Programs," Ngo's latest article examines the effects of smart-parking policies on public transit, traffic flow, and air pollution. Results show that San Francisco's smart parking program, SFPark, led to a significant increase in bus ridership and a reduction in traffic flow. Learn more about the research by reading our earlier recap or watching a recording of a 2017 webinar presented by Dr. Ngo.
Student Spotlight: Julian Griffee, University of Arizona
Julian Griffee is a second-year masters student in urban and regional planning at the University of Arizona and a 2020 TRB Minority Student Fellow. He received his B.S. in Geography with a concentration in land use planning from the University of North Carolina at Charlotte. Professionally, he has worked as a Planner, volunteered with the Peace Corps service in Albania, and interned within the City of Tucson Department of Transportation Bicycle and Pedestrian Program as well as the Burlington-Graham Metropolitan Planning Organization in North Carolina. He is currently working as a Climate Adaptation Outreach Assistant for the City of Tucson, Arizona.
Upcoming Professional Development from NITC
Check out the upcoming (free) offerings and register to watch:

November 19 Webinar with Jason Anderson of PSU: "Evaluating Urban Arterial Reliability Performance Metrics"

December 3 Webinar with Stephen Fickas and Marc Schlossberg of the University of Oregon: "Letting Bike Riders Catch the Green Wave"

Fridays in the Fall: Friday Transportation Seminars at PSU - the next seminar is tomorrow (online and in-person) on "PDX Next: Redesigning Portland International Airport"
NITC Research and Partner Update
NITC University Partners
The National Institute for Transportation and Communities (NITC), is a program of the Transportation Research and Education Center (TREC) at Portland State University. NITC is one of seven U.S. Department of Transportation national university transportation centers. The NITC program is a Portland State-led partnership with the Oregon Institute of Technology, University of Arizona, University of Oregon, University of Texas at Arlington and University of Utah. We pursue our theme—improving mobility of people and goods to build strong communities—through research, education and technology transfer.
 
 
 
 
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